Getting Started on Your Renal Diet

//Getting Started on Your Renal Diet

Getting Started on Your Renal Diet

When your kidneys fail, waste products and fluids that normally leave the body as urine remain in your blood. Dialysis removes most of those poisons, but between dialysis treatments, waste builds up again. That is why it is important for you to control the amount and type of food and beverage you eat and drink every day.

Until you meet with your Registered Dietitian Nutritionist at the dialysis clinic for medical nutrition therapy, here are some general guidelines to follow:

♦ Do not add salt to your food. To season foods, use herbs, spices, and salt free
flavorings. Mrs. Dash, onion powder, garlic powder, lemon pepper, lemon juice, lime juice, and vinegar are all good choices. Do not use salt substitute – it is loaded with potassium!!!

♦ Try to include 2-3 servings of high quality protein daily (lean meat, fish, poultry, egg whites). One serving of meat is 3 ounces (about the size of a deck of cards). Limit to a total of 10 ounces daily. Avoid cheese and lunch meat due to their high salt and fat content. Canned tuna can be used if rinsed under running water for two minutes to reduce the sodium content.

♦ Limit milk, yogurt, and ice cream to just one small serving a day. One serving is one-half cup. Non-dairy creamers such as Coffee-mate can be used freely.

♦ Eat no more than 3 servings of fruit each day. One serving is one- half cup or one medium fresh fruit. Choose from the list of low potassium fruits.

♦ Limit vegetables to 2 servings each day. One serving is one-half cup raw or cooked vegetable or one cup tossed salad. Choose from the list of low
potassium vegetables.

♦ Limit fluids to 4 cups or 32 ounces per day (8 ounces = 1 cup). Beverages such as water, lemonade, clear sodas, coffee, tea, and cranberry juice are okay to use—just watch the amounts! Any food that is liquid at room temperature is counted as a fluid, that includes ice, gelatin, and frozen desserts.

♦ Avoid nuts, bran, whole-grains, and chocolate. These foods are high in both potassium and phosphorus and will increase those levels in your blood.

♦ Butter, margarine, mayonnaise, most salad dressings, and vegetable oil (especially olive) can be used liberally.

♦ If you have diabetes, continue to eat meals and snacks at regular times and control your carbohydrate intake. For low blood glucose reactions, do not use orange juice, it is high in potassium!!! Cranberry or apple juice are safer choices.

LOW POTASSIUM FRUITS  & VEGETABLES

The following fruits & vegetables are low in potassium and are good choices to eat. One fruit serving is one-half cup or one medium fresh fruit. One vegetable serving is one-half cup cooked or raw vegetable or one cup tossed salad. You may have a total of five servings a day from the foods listed below:

FRUITS

Apples
Applesauce
Apricots (canned)
Blackberries
Blueberries
Cherries
Cranberries/Cranberry sauce
Figs (1 fresh or 3 canned)
Fruit Cocktail
Grapefruit (one-half)
Grapes
Lemons
Limes
Peaches (canned)
Pears (canned)
Pineapples
Plums
Raspberries
Strawberries
Tangerines
Watermelon

JUICES

Apple Juice
Cranberry Juice
Grape Juice
Grapefruit Juice
Lemon Juice, Lime Juice
Nectars: Apricot, Peach, or Pear
Pineapple Juice
Tang

VEGETABLES

Asparagus
Beans (green or wax)
Beets
Broccoli
Cabbage
Carrots
Cauliflower
Celery
Coleslaw
Corn
Cucumber
Eggplant
Lettuce
Mixed vegetables
Mushrooms
Onions
Peas
Peppers (bell or sweet)
Potatoes (leached only) *see recipe page 4
Radishes
Squash (summer)

HIGH POTASSIUM FOODS TO AVOID

Potassium plays a role in keeping your heartbeat regular and your muscles working properly. It is the job of the kidneys to keep the right amount of potassium in your body. Since your kidneys no longer work well, it is now your job to watch your potassium intake by avoiding high potassium foods. A high blood level of potassium can weaken your heart!!!

FRUITS

Apricots (fresh)
Avocado
Banana
Cantaloupe
Dates
Dried Fruits
Honeydew
Kiwi
Mangoes
Nectarines
Oranges
Papaya
Pears (fresh)
Peaches (fresh)
Pumpkin
Prunes
Rhubarb

Juices

Orange Juice
Prune Juice
Tomato Juice

VEGETABLES

Artichokes
Beans (baked, lima, navy, pinto)
Brussels Sprouts
Greens
Lentils
Potatoes (unless leached)
Spinach
Squash (winter)
Tomatoes

LEACHING POTATOES TO LOWER POTASSIUM:

♦  Peel medium potato, dice or slice thinly into ¼” pieces. Place in 2 quarts water and soak overnight.

♦  When ready to use the next day, drain off all water. Place in fresh water and boil until tender.

♦  Vegetable Juice Potatoes that have been leached this way can be fried, mashed or put in soups or stews.

SAMPLE MENU

BREAKFAST

½ cup cran-apple juice
1 small toasted bagel with margarine
1 cup Corn Flakes with ½ cup liquid non-dairy creamer
1-2 eggs
½ cup coffee or tea


SNACK

15 small grapes


LUNCH

3 ounces sliced turkey on 2 slices of white bread
Lettuce leaf and one thin tomato slice
Mayonnaise
½ cup carrot sticks
2 peach halves topped with Cool Whip
½ cup ginger ale


SNACK

3 graham crackers


DINNER

4-5 ounces roast beef
1 cup noodles tossed with olive oil
½ cup peas
½ cup fruit cocktail
½ cup cranberry juice


SNACK

6 vanilla wafers


Sandra J. Fishman, MS, RDN, LDN © January 2018

By | 2018-03-15T02:13:02+00:00 February 3rd, 2018|Patient Education|
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